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I decided when I was going to change my fork oil in my bike that I would rebuild the forks at the same time.
Not much on making videos so here are some pics as this way is a very easy one man job, and a vise is not needed.
It'd be great if @Pauljp made a video on this.
NOTE: The fork tube doesn't need to be loosened or removed from the triple trees.
Do one fork at a time as there is no advantage of taking both apart.

Put bike on lift.

1. Unbolt and zip tie the calipers to the toe pegs.

2. Remove the two pinch bolts and front wheel axle (my 2012 was a 1/2" drive 16mm Allen, but newer models may be a 14mm Allen). Anyway the only place I could find the 16mm one was on Amazon.
No part stores or hardware stores carried it.

3. Remove the four bolts for the front fender and set it somewhere safe.

4. Loosen and remove the Allen bolt from the bottom of the fork and have a bucket or oil pan handy.
Slide fork bottom tube assembly carefully downwards and set aside taking care not to scratch or dent it.

5. Loosen the top cap several turns until you can gently lift up on the strut and the cap lifts with it.
Once that happens remove the strut assembly by lifting it up and out of the fork tube.

6. Remove the dust seal being careful not to damage the fork inside. Then remove the snap-ring. Next was to remove the seal and flat spacer (i used a small flat rubber covered handle to insulate the fork tube from damage while levering the seal puller. To remove the lower bushing I used a long piece of small diameter tubing being careful not to damage the upper bushing as it can't be replaced and gently drove out the lower bushing from above with a hammer working around in several spots along it's circumference.

7. Spray out the upper fork tube with brake clean and run some paper towels through it again being careful not to damage the upper bushing.

8. Spray out the lower fork tube with brake clean and run some paper towels into it and carefully using a gun cleaning rod to push the paper towels back out. I did this several times. Also clean off the slide portion of the tube itself and apply a light coat of fork oil over it's surface.

9. Install the lower bushing into the upper fork tube by gently tapping it with a seal driver.

9. Install the flat spacer and seal making sure that the flattest side of the washer is facing the seal and the seal is correctly oriented.with the spring side up. Use a seal driver and gently drive it in. Install snap ring.

10. Grease the inside lips of the seal.

11. Slide the strut assembly into the upper fork tube being careful not to damage the upper bushing or the lower bushing/seal set, and zip tie it to the handle bars thereby making room for adding oil later.

11. Install the lower dust seal onto the lower fork tube and carefully slide the fork into the upper fork tube.

12. install the bottom fork Allen bolt and it's copper washer and torque down.

13. Add fork oil using a small funnel. I used 10W

14. Cut zip tie and gently lower cap down and onto the threads and tighten down to torque specs which by the way ain't very tight.

15. Slide dust cover up the lower tube and into upper fork tube. Make sure it's seated well all the way around.

16. Do the next fork.
 

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I picked up a 5/8 allen socket from Harbor Freight as it is hard to get a 16mm locally anywhere. It's close enough.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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I could be mistaken about the size, come to think of it. But I did find an SAE size that was damn near perfect for mine.
 
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I could be mistaken about the size, come to think of it. But I did find an SAE size that was damn near perfect for mine.
You are not mistaken 16mm =5/8" the difference is maybe 1/2 a **** hair probably more like 1/8 of a **** hair.

In the absence of actual hairs here and home...the difference between 16mm & 5/8 is .006

Nice job @primethious
 

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Just changed the fork oil myself on my 2011 CC. Did it a little different though and removed the forks from the bike. I don't think you could do it as above with a CC because you would have to remove inner and outer fairing. It appears that by removing the bottom allen bolt you do not need a spring compressor???? Is this correct because I had to build my own and it was a nuisance. I did not replace the seals this time, thought I would do this next time

Great write up and pics, wish you had done this last weekend. Did you just add the recommended amount of oil, I measured mine 106 mm from the top of the tube plus or minus a millimetre. Not sure if I was that accurate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just changed the fork oil myself on my 2011 CC. Did it a little different though and removed the forks from the bike. I don't think you could do it as above with a CC because you would have to remove inner and outer fairing. It appears that by removing the bottom allen bolt you do not need a spring compressor???? Is this correct because I had to build my own and it was a nuisance. I did not replace the seals this time, thought I would do this next time

Great write up and pics, wish you had done this last weekend. Did you just add the recommended amount of oil, I measured mine 106 mm from the top of the tube plus or minus a millimetre. Not sure if I was that accurate.
If you do have to remove the tubes on a XC then just crack loose the bottom Allen and well loosen up the top cap before breaking the main pinch bolts then you won't need a vice.

I left the spring/cartridge combo intact so no spring compressor was needed. On the fluid I got it as close as I could to the amount listed in the manual 481cc's +/- 3cc's (16.27 fl oz) +/- .1 fl oz.
Even though the manual says to double check by measuring after adding the oil while at the same time having the springs and retainers pulled apart and removed others have just added fluid without issues so I went for it. I did let it drain for a good while.

For the guys that are willing to take the springs apart please take a pic of your spring compressor setup and post it if possible.
fyi WD's sell one best I recall.
 

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Ok, I have a problem. I am replacing my seals and have both forks off my 2013 cross country. I was able to loosen and remove one of the drain bolts but on the second on, I broke it free but it just spins. I have loosened the top nut on the tube to see if there is a place to grab on to so that I could continue to loosen the bottom brain bolt. Nothing is working. I did remove the oil from the top. Any ideas? Thanks for the help.
 

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Ok, I have a problem. I am replacing my seals and have both forks off my 2013 cross country. I was able to loosen and remove one of the drain bolts but on the second on, I broke it free but it just spins. I have loosened the top nut on the tube to see if there is a place to grab on to so that I could continue to loosen the bottom brain bolt. Nothing is working. I did remove the oil from the top. Any ideas? Thanks for the help.
How did you get the Allen bolt loose? I have the same problem
 
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