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Hello, thevog.net

So two of my buddies and I went on a ride today toward the mountains. I live in central California and the Sierra Nevada Mountains and hill are right in our back yard. I've been riding for about 3 years, taken a few riding courses and I just bought my 2005 Vegas early this year. One of my buddies drives a Yami V-star 1100 and the other V-star 650. We started off as a pack but as soon as the curves begin and hills they completely dust me. My Vegas is almost both of their bikes combined (engine size). But even the 650 leaves my in the dust. I take my time, going around the curves at 45-55mph and faster on the straight away. Every so many miles, they'll pull over and wait for me to catch up then they leave me behind again...... What speed do you guys ride at, comfort speed on curves, hills, straights? or am I just being a nancy....lol

I would really like to hear what everyone, anyone has to say.
 

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It's not that you're being a Nancy, you just gotta find your comfort level and, of that means driving slower than them, so be it. I guess I can't say for certain but, I feel like your bike can easily outperform theirs. I ride with my dad, me on a CCT and him on his 107 road king, and I leave him in the dust. I have a SLIGHTLY smaller engine and a good amount of weight more than him but, I just ride harder than him.
 

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Admititly you only have 3 years of riding. Experience over cubic inches,,is that the case?
 

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Wow!
Depends on many things like the type of curve, road conditions, traffic, time of year (deer), riding alone or experience of people I'm riding with, which bike I'm on etc....

First: Ride at your own pace, always! As Dirty Harry said "A man must know his limitations".
If you want to ride faster than practice & learn or take a riders course: basic, advanced & even track.

Second: Engine size. Bigger does not mean anything. I have seen guys on a '70's 350 2-stroke out ride guys on much bigger machines, skill has a lot more to do with it.

I tend to ride the Vic normally in the 70 to 80 range, & most curves at double the posted speed.
Remember I live in flat land Florida & most curves here are what are called sweepers so it's probably easier to take them at speed than where you ride.

Last: I have found that most riders especially newer riders have difficulty leaning into the curve & also they tend to look down at the road or at spot just in front of the front wheel.
The bike will go where you look so if you are not "looking thru the curve" you will tend to get shaky & want to hit a brake which is going to end badly.
Don't let your eyes fixate on one spot keep them moving always looking in the distance on the other side of the curve.
Practice that on every curve even on slow curves or going thru an intersection.

Enjoy your ride & don't let others dictate how you ride, not everybody is built to go fast.
 
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Hello, thevog.net

So two of my buddies and I went on a ride today toward the mountains. I live in central California and the Sierra Nevada Mountains and hill are right in our back yard. I've been riding for about 3 years, taken a few riding courses and I just bought my 2005 Vegas early this year. One of my buddies drives a Yami V-star 1100 and the other V-star 650. We started off as a pack but as soon as the curves begin and hills they completely dust me. My Vegas is almost both of their bikes combined (engine size). But even the 650 leaves my in the dust. I take my time, going around the curves at 45-55mph and faster on the straight away. Every so many miles, they'll pull over and wait for me to catch up then they leave me behind again...... What speed do you guys ride at, comfort speed on curves, hills, straights? or am I just being a nancy....lol

I would really like to hear what everyone, anyone has to say.
Ride your ride, and how you want... You are also heavier than them and probably have not learned to trust the tires to stick in a curve. Get used to leaning in curves the proper way. I ride a kingpin and I can out corner many, but I've also quite a few years more riding experience and well bonded with my bike...
 

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Don't worry about trying to keep up. Ride at your own pace. Doing more than you can handle is a case for disaster. It takes time and there are learning curves. (Really no pun intended....)
 
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Like others have already said, don't worry about what they think. Ride how you are comfortable and ride how you want to. Riding a motorcycle is a big risk as it is, mostly because of idiot car drivers. Enjoy your ride and your bike. Speed comes with experience and comfort. But speed also isn't needed everywhere or all the time. To me, the biggest part of riding is looking around and enjoying the experience.
 

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It's all about experience. And education. Tell you what I have done and do and you can see if it works for you. First thing, I didn't even begin to feel comfortable with a bike until I had at least 5-6 thousand miles under me. That was about six months back when I first got started (It's been close to 10 years now and I've got well over 100K on varioius bikes). The point is this, miles and practice equals experience. But, just riding is not necessarily gaining experience. Ride with other people and watch them (especially if they are good and not reckless) Catch every detail, how they lean, where they start and end their curves, etc. Then listen and read right here. You'd be surprised how many little tips show up in a conversation that can go unnoticed.

Watch videos of professionals and learn from what they show you and what they tell you. Then take it on the road and practice. If you learn a tip, go try it. And get to know the feel of YOUR bike. How does it feel when the back tire breaks traction either on take off, coming out of a corner, or when dropping the clutch on a quick stop. Become comfortable with such things. It's not as bad as it first feels, ;but you gotta know that and practice it.

To answer some of your questions. Here in Texas there are places where the limit is 85. I sometimes ride with a LEO or two, and not to out anybody but the speed limit for most of the guys I ride with is a suggestion only. Now, as for the twisties, When I ride an area I pay attention to the MPH markers that are usually placed before every turn. Here, in Texas, I have found that I can comfortably take a curve at least 20 t0 25 mph faster than posted. (that's on my cct.....I couldn't do that on the Nomads) In Arkansas, maybe a little slower, but it's about the same. In New Mexico, they tend not to be so conservative, so I can't take them quite that much over. Each region is a little different in the posting of limits. But, before you get there, you gotta do all the other stuff first. And it's a marathon, not a sprint. Make it your goal to learn something new everytime you ride, and try to push just a little more. You'll get comfortable as time goes on. Hope this helps. It's like playing the piano, you'll get better if you keep doing it and adding new music as you go. Have fun.


Oh, and the MPH marker thing is just a benchmark. It lets you know what's possible, and how you can sort of gauge yourself as you learn. Don't become dependant on these things, but use them at first and for awhile. Eventually, you will not have to worry about them and the riding and turning will become more instinctive. I don't pay that much attention to them now, except when first starting out in unfamiliar territory, but once I have the jist of things, I ride "in a groove" if you will.
 

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I'm not a speed demon by no means but I never thought I was slow until I rode with @Mountainrider lol

But it bothers me not. I just enjoy the ride brother!
 

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Pretty much what already has been stated but perhaps the wrong question. Are your friends being extreme? Do they want to push you to ride harder? I haven't seen the curves so only you really know. Maybe your instincts are serving you well. If you really want to know if it's you or the bikes simply change rides with your buddies. If it goes the same then it's probably your inexperience. But the question still remains are they being extreme or pushing you harder. IMHO I believe your ride, given the same driver, is a better handling bike, and I like Yamaha. YouTube has some great videos. Do you want to enjoy where you're going or look where you've been? Oh and watch out for the...
Snake Automotive tire Nature Synthetic rubber Reptile
 

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Boy you ain't just woofin about them darn "snakes". Back in my early riding carreer, I had an unscheduled dismount on my first Nomad. Couple of broken ribs and a solid black a$$ where I hit pavement and slid. But, about a couple of months I'm riding around on my Sabre with Kelli and get into a mild sweeper and hit a bunch of tar snakes (summer time, don't cha know) Somewhat like riding on oil and I'm already still a bit skiddish. DAMN!! that's the only way to say how that felt. All the way home I was pumping adrenaline and trying to slow my heart.
 

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Boy you ain't just woofin about them darn "snakes". Back in my early riding carreer, I had an unscheduled dismount on my first Nomad. Couple of broken ribs and a solid black a$$ where I hit pavement and slid. But, about a couple of months I'm riding around on my Sabre with Kelli and get into a mild sweeper and hit a bunch of tar snakes (summer time, don't cha know) Somewhat like riding on oil and I'm already still a bit skiddish. DAMN!! that's the only way to say how that felt. All the way home I was pumping adrenaline and trying to slow my heart.
I've heard if you pucker just right you get over it quicker. :angel4::yr1:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you everyone for the all the responses. All are great.

Early in my motorcycle carrier, an ol vet. gave me that advice "ride your own ride". And although it's a bit frustrating at times, I remember that saying and the fact that I want to be safe, make it home rather than get my self out of the comfort zone and end up doing something stupid. Sometimes when I see them speed off and out of sight around a curve, I wonder if they even get to enjoy the scenery.....

They don't push me to keep up. I guess we are all riding our own ride, both of them just have years of riding over me, more experience and comfort.
 

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You are a much wiser person than I was as a young man.
My dad had a little sign over his desk that said: "If you ain't the lead dog you're smellin ass holes".
It was meant as a joke but I think I took it seriously.
 

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Seems like your friends could ride a bit slower so you can hang with them. As already stated many times take your time and learn. Going slower you get to have more appreciation for your surroundings. Whats the hurry? I do like to push my limits sometimes and it really scares the crap out of me lol. I don't know how hard you can push the small tire on a Vegas. I have been working on my slow maneuvers lately and it's alot of fun.
 
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I've heard if you pucker just right you get over it quicker. :angel4::yr1:
Had to sell that Honda with a big ol dimple in the seat. That enough "pucker" for ya?? :crackup:
 

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You always have to ride your own ride. Pride and ego can get you killed.

When i lead rides i always make it clear that i ride like an asshole so there's no need to keep up with me. If i see you falling behind I'll back off and ill never leave anybody lost. Just keep riding and I'll be stopped and waiting for you to catch up anywhere there's a stop sign, intetsection or turnoff on the route. I don't mind waiting for people to catch up and if we are both able to ride at a pace that we find comfortsble then we'll both be able to enjoy the ride more.
 

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Thank you everyone for the all the responses. All are great.

Early in my motorcycle carrier, an ol vet. gave me that advice "ride your own ride". And although it's a bit frustrating at times, I remember that saying and the fact that I want to be safe, make it home rather than get my self out of the comfort zone and end up doing something stupid. Sometimes when I see them speed off and out of sight around a curve, I wonder if they even get to enjoy the scenery.....

They don't push me to keep up. I guess we are all riding our own ride, both of them just have years of riding over me, more experience and comfort.
Don't you worry about slow or fast, of keeping up with your buds. I dare say, we've all been there. I know I have, but now we (many of us) can keep up with just about anybody, and even smoke a few if we're feeling honery that day. But you got it...that's not what it's about, and a mature rider knows that.
 
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