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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is a link to the newspaper story about a huge sale of 1970's and 1980's mostly Japanese bikes and parts.
http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local_news/bye-bye_to_an_sa_biker_landmark_96613164.html
It is quite a place. I went today at lunch and took a few pictures. I will try to upload them.
Check out the place using Google Maps. Look at some of the stuff that is sitting outside!
http://maps.google.com/maps?hl=en&ie=UTF8&ll=29.420495,-98.442494&spn=0.001787,0.003482&t=h&z=19
It may be the largest salvage yard of 1970s and '80s Japanese motorcycles in all of San Antonio, if not Texas.
While some of the vintage bikes at Action Cycle Warehouse at 3011 E. Commerce St. could be taken for a spin after a quick tuneup, others - caked with rust or caliche - look like they found their final resting place in a yard behind the building.
Regardless of condition, starting today they're all for sale - along with tens of thousands of bike parts scattered throughout the 20,000-square-foot nondescript warehouse.
Owner Tom Freeland, whose shop pays homage to these relics of a bygone era, is liquidating the vast inventory before moving into cozier digs seven miles away.
"Most people look at this and all they see is, quote, unquote, junk," said Freeland, 39, looking out over his vast inventory. "You just have to look beyond that and realize ... a lot of these bikes have scarcity value to them."
The warehouse's closing likely will stir the memories for many bikers who frequented it over the past 30 years or so. Not many San Antonio businesses can match its colorful past.
For most of its incarnation, the business was known as ABE Cycle Sales and was run by Abraham Fortune - a man with a criminal past, according to court documents.
Fortune seemingly hoarded the vintage Japanese bikes like a pack rat, making no effort to restore or sell any of them. Freeland couldn't explain it.
"I don't know anything about him," Freeland said, "but in my opinion (Fortune thought) it was safer than banks. He was an interesting character."
Added Action Cycle customer Frank Flores, who knew Fortune: "It's a bike thing. It's kind of hard to explain. How do you collect bikes? It's just something you do."
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
It is not just the stuff you see in these pictures...The have three BSA frames with internal oil reservoirs. Pallets of motors. Tanks tanks and more tanks. Fenders, covers, controls, instrument clusters and wiring. This place is still full of junk. It made the front page of the paper on Friday.

A coworker walked out with three tires for $30 that fit his BSA chopper.

















 

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Used to belong to a guy named Abe. He took all the good Triumph stuff with him when he sold to the existing owner. They throw stuff in bins, don't de-rust tanks, leave it all in the weather. 90% of all of it is nothing more than junk.

I looked for a chrome fender once. They let me in the back. Spent an hour looking. Not a single fender without dents. They throw them in the bin then walk on them when the look for matches.

Its pretty sad.
 
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