VOG Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,850 Posts
Thanks for posting this. In the past, this event was held in July. I did a little surfing and learned why they changed it to June:

The annual RTW Day moves to the 'third Monday in June.' The next Ride to Work Day isMONDAY, JUNE 15, 2009. It is the 18th annual Ride to Work Day. Reasons for an earlier annual Ride to Work Day include:
  • The new day is not as hot in most northern hemisphere areas, and not as cold in most southern hemisphere areas.June weather is more favorable worldwide.
  • The new dayprovides an increased opportunityfor more riders to Ride to Work. Many workplaces close for summer holiday in July - especially in Europe.
  • A Monday event encourages motorcycle and scooter commuting to continue during theentire week.
  • Positive media exposurewill increase. Sundays are slower 'news days' so there will be more coverage like this: "Look for more motorcycles on your commute tomorrow, as Monday is the annual Ride to Work day..."
  • The Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme (FIM) has endorsed this day, and is promoting the 'Third Monday in June' worldwide as the annual Ride to Work Day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,276 Posts
dsjr70 said:
Forcast for rain that day... Oh, I forget where I live same forecast everyday until September :-(
Rumor has it that ya aren't that sweet that you will melt.

It's already been proven I don't melt. There goes MY cover! And ya'll though I was oh so sweet LOLOL
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,850 Posts
Here's some info from the MSF...

The 18th Annual Ride to Work Day, for motorcyclists, is on June 15. For two separate set of green reasons, this year's national grass-roots effort is more relevant than ever. Motorcycles and scooters are a great way to save a lot of green while being more environmentally green at the same time.

People are getting this message and there are far more riders than ever. The number of American households that own motorcycles jumped 26 percent from 2003 to 2008, while the overall number of U.S. households increased roughly 5 percent. During the same period, the motorcycle population grew 19 percent while the U.S. population rose by about 5 percent.


The latest Motorcycle Industry Council Owner Survey found that, among reasons for riding, "commuting and errands" jumped to the No. 2 spot only behind riding for pleasure. In 2008, as gas prices topped $4 a gallon, scooter sales rose to 222,000 for the year - the highest level yet.


Riding to work has a lot of benefits, for motorcyclists and for the nation. All the facts are below:

TWO-WHEELS SAVING GREEN

When it comes to greenbacks, motorcycles cost much less to buy. There are many fine, capable bikes available for less than $4,000.

Maintenance costs are much less on a bike.

Registration is less money.

So is insurance.

The vast majority of two-wheelers are very much about sensible transportation exactly right for the times.

TWO-WHEELS ARE GREEN


Whether you ride or not, everyone can appreciate what a two-wheeler does for the environment versus a car, even a hybrid.

It starts with hundreds or even thousands of pounds less in raw materials, and that can include the toxic elements used in hybrid car batteries.

There's less energy required to ship a motorcycle from factory to dealership.

With smaller engines and fewer components, there's less use of motor oil and chemicals throughout the life of the bike.

And, of course, there's less use of gasoline, as a motorcycle or scooter can get two, three, sometimes four times the MPG of four-wheelers using the same roads.

Less fuel use means less CO2 emissions, now recognized as a pollutant and long known to cause climate change.

Altogether, motorcycles are very green machines, capable of everyday transportation (particularly in sunny California) while minimizing waste.

BOTTOM LINE ON BIKES


Motorcycles reduce traffic congestion and parking problems, benefiting all manner of motorists.

Motorcycling is much more than a weekend thrill for enthusiasts, customizers and collectors.

Motorcycles are a practical part of the answer to our economic and ecological troubles.

BACKGROUND STATS


WAY MORE BIKES AND RIDERS: Since 2003, the number of motorcycles owned and used in America grew 19 percent to approximately 10.4 million. Continuing a trend, that was a 58 percent increase since 1998, estimated then at 6.6 million. To imagine motorcycling today, picture a population greater than that of New York City (the residents of Moscow, Seoul or the entire state of Michigan) all on two wheels.

25 MILLION people swung a leg over a bike and rode last year. That's a 7 percent increase, from 2003, in the number of Americans who ride but may or may not own motorcycles.

WAY MORE WOMEN: Female ownership of motorcycles crossed the 10-percent mark, increasing from 9.6 percent in 2003 up to 12.3 percent in 2008. Younger generations have even more female riders. Some 15 percent of Gen X motorcycle owners are women, and for Gen Y, it's 14 percent. Among Gen Xers, women more than doubled their presence since 1998. Maybe most impressive, women accounted for 23 percent, or 5.7 million, of the 25 million Americans who rode a motorcycle last year.

WAY MORE YOUTH: In 2003, Baby Boomer riders outnumbered Gen Y motorcyclists almost four to one. But Gen Y motorcycle ownership grew 62 percent since 2003, putting the current ratio of Baby Boomers to Gen Y at two to one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,135 Posts
Pretty sure my employer won't be endorsing that one since they exclude me from medical coverage if I am injured on a motorcycle. TOTAL BS! How that is legal on the basis that I don't receive equal coverage for equal cost I don't know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,719 Posts
I'll be thinking about it. My tins are at the painter, dropped them off this morning, told I'd have them back by the end of next week, not in time. Other bike has expired plates and is already in the garge at work.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top