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Having owned a VTX 1300 for 5 years, I belonged to the VTXOA bb. Made a lot of friends there and still post. I changed my sig pic to one of the XC. It's amazing how many PM's I'm getting from current VTX'ers regarding the new bike. I started a thread on the general m/c forum that got so big it got moved to the off topic forum.
Lots of debate about why we were all looking at Victory. My opinion is that Honda isn't offering anything that fits the progression a lot of VTX riders are following. I wanted a non- Harley bagger. Honda doesn't make one.
A lot of people feel the same way.
Oh well; just thought I'd throw this out there to see if any other metric riders experienced the same thing.
 

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My last bike before my Vision was a Gold Wing some years back. So, the progression, for me at least, was natural. I also liked what the Vision offered over the Wing, which made it easier. However, you're right, Honda doesn't offer anything specific in the bagger area until you get to the Wing, which is a big jump from a VTX1300. I guess you could bag-up a VTX1800, but why? On the other hand, Vic doesn't do anything in the lower end and might find that market some day.

Honda has really dropped the ball the last several years and models. Their sales drop and market share drop would seem to reflect that, while Victory succeeds.
 

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I just purchased my first Honda about 6 months ago. It is a great bike and does everything it is supposed to do very well. Honda is probably the best all around motorcycle on the market today. Everything from sportbikes to touring bikes no company comes close to them in selection. Kawasaki tried with the Voyager but that has been a royal failure, wrong bike at the wrong time. My favorite company is Suzuki, designs have gone very stale across the whole lineup with the only stand out bike being the M109R.
I still think and have posted many times that if Vic came out with an entry level bike their sales will sore. Motorcycle riders are very brand loyal, you get them on one and they will keep buying. Crap, how many have I bought and I have one on order right now and a new Vision in my future.
I know that their are people on here that think the Vegas 8-Ball is an entry bike but it is not (IMHO) it is just low priced. A 100ci bike I dont feel should be anyones first bike. A 4-500lb under 60ci is the perfect size for an entry level with a price point under 9k...
Like I said, just my opinion.
 

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dsjr70 said:
I just purchased my first Honda about 6 months ago. It is a great bike and does everything it is supposed to do very well. Honda is probably the best all around motorcycle on the market today. Everything from sportbikes to touring bikes no company comes close to them in selection. Kawasaki tried with the Voyager but that has been a royal failure, wrong bike at the wrong time. My favorite company is Suzuki, designs have gone very stale across the whole lineup with the only stand out bike being the M109R.
I still think and have posted many times that if Vic came out with an entry level bike their sales will sore. Motorcycle riders are very brand loyal, you get them on one and they will keep buying. Crap, how many have I bought and I have one on order right now and a new Vision in my future.
I know that their are people on here that think the Vegas 8-Ball is an entry bike but it is not (IMHO) it is just low priced. A 100ci bike I dont feel should be anyones first bike. A 4-500lb under 60ci is the perfect size for an entry level with a price point under 9k...
Like I said, just my opinion.
i agree somewhat that a 100" bike for a beginner can be too much , however i just got my 8 ball and was thinking this is going to be to much bike for me what did i do , well i have been on it every day since last sunday .

when i picked it up at arlens i came home for about 10 mins and me and a buddy of mine rode 70 miles that day all over the backroads of dublin,to walnut creek same places on the american thunder episode with arlen and colby , i am really at ease with this bike it handles like a dream, it is not to much for me any more i just ride within my limit at all times.
 

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I agree with both of you! Coming from a sportster, I would say you are both correct.

Yes, Victory should have an entry level bike that is smaller displacement, lighter weight and lower price. It certainly would round out their line, and imagine if they could take some of the styling cues from, say a CC or Vision, and put them into a basic, entry level bike....the possibility of becoming the best entry level bike in the market! Sell them with a restricted intake and exhaust, like all the other bikes, and let the buyers mod 'em.

I also think that the Kingpin is a very easy bike to ride. Comfortable, well balanced, same size wheels front and back (not 21 in front and 16 in back), and very user friendly to drive. All of these things make the KP a really nice bike. Add in the fact that you can get a KP 8ball for about $12K and now you're talking.
 

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SmattaHead said:
I agree with both of you! Coming from a sportster, I would say you are both correct.

Yes, Victory should have an entry level bike that is smaller displacement, lighter weight and lower price. It certainly would round out their line, and imagine if they could take some of the styling cues from, say a CC or Vision, and put them into a basic, entry level bike....the possibility of becoming the best entry level bike in the market! Sell them with a restricted intake and exhaust, like all the other bikes, and let the buyers mod 'em.

I also think that the Kingpin is a very easy bike to ride. Comfortable, well balanced, same size wheels front and back (not 21 in front and 16 in back), and very user friendly to drive. All of these things make the KP a really nice bike. Add in the fact that you can get a KP 8ball for about $12K and now you're talking.
Sorry, this is where I differ with you. I have purchased my share of bikes and used to buy the entry level as it was cheaper and the full up bike was "Too much bike for me anyway". This has played out in 3-4 months where I find myself looking for more in the throttle and/or an extra gear, also feeling the bike was too small for me. In the end, I ended up trading the barely broken in bike (with a substantial loss) for the bike I really wanted in the first place.
I have had dozens of new riders ask me about buying their first bike. My response used to be to go small and work your way up, but this led them to the same point I was in, ready to trade in (with the financial loss)far quicker than they had anticipated.
Also, I feel that for a new rider consistancy and predictability are very important when developing new skills. These new riders were learning to ride one bike, then trading and having to re learn the characteristics of a new bike. IMHO, learning twice what they may have been better off just learning once.
So now my answer to potential first time riders looking to purchase is to:
1. Go get your MC license. (Take the class that ends with you getting your license or borrow a friends for the exam.)
2. Get to any of the bigger MC events and test drive as many bikes as you can, to include the one you are interested in. (Daytona Bike Week has Dozens of manufacturersthere just for you to sign up for a test drive. Use them ALL. Also Victory now has the travelling test drive truck. Ask a local dealer, they'll know where it will be.)
3. Get the bike you REALLY want, or risk being dissapointed and loosing money when/if you tradeup. Also, theyonly have to learn to handle one bike in your first few years of motorcycling.
Just My $0.02 worth.
 

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My first bike was a Fat Boy. Some would say that a soft tail, like the Fat Boy,would be too much bike for a first timer. I debated for along time before I pulled the trigger and came to the conclusion that I wanted to get the bike I really wanted instead of buying small and then trading up. I honestly never looked at fearing the size of the bike I wanted. To me, a soft tail is a decent bike to start off with. A lot has to do with the person too. I never had a problem from day one. Maybe others would want to start off small, and there are gazillion small bikes out there to start off with, but for me, the decision worked out. I actually moved up from the soft tail to the Ultra Classic and thats where I say NO to a first timer. The difference in weight is dramatic! I'm also vertically challenged and Harley's are notoriously designed and fittedfor taller riders.
I now have my Vision and I wouldn't have done it any other way. I got the bikes that I wanted and rode all of them safely. At the end of the day, you gotta go with the decision that will set you up bestfor the long term.
 

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For some reason people have this impression that starter bikes are smaller and less powerful then real bikes. It is more of a weight and price issue. Getting on a 600lb bike and spending 12k is a little scary for someone that hasnt riden yet. Getting on a 400lb bike for under 6k is reasonable loss to some people if they decide not to ride.
Dave (using you for an example since you brought up a Fatboy), a Fatboy is a 700lb bike costing around 15k and pushing about 62hp. My personal preference for a first bike is a Suzuki C-50, it is around 450lbs, $6k and 44hp. It's body size is larger then the Fatboy and with the weight difference the hp/weight is about equal.
But the biggest thing is, as a manufacturer if you get them on their first bike they typically will buy there second and third bike from you.
 
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