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Is the Kingpin too big for a new rider?

  • YES - too big!

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Help the Newb! Bike too big?

2089 Views 21 Replies 20 Participants Last post by  SPEEDFREAK
Hey everyone. First Post and new rider here. Thanks for hosting a great site full of information. I'm really happy to have joined. So on to my question.

I'm new to riding and have had my licence for about 4 months and have ridden around 800 miles or so on a Zontes Mantis 125cc buzz box to get some experience (as I was advised to here in the UK) but have come to truly loath its lack of pull (don't even think of going up a hill above 3rd and doing more than 35mph). It's almost a pushbike.

That said I come back with a smile on my face every time I ride it as I love riding. So on to my big question...

Is there a bike that's too big for me as a newb? I have fallen in love with the Victory Kingpin which is roughly 17x the engine capacity of my current bike. I am struggling to find a good reason not to buy it. Am I being stupid here? My instructor advised I get a 125cc then a 600-800cc before going for a bigger bike. I'm not riding super sports here its a cruiser.

For info I'm a 29, 6ft 3in tall male weighing 94kg (207lb).

Help a newb and let me know what you think!

Thanks,

Robb
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Hey everyone. First Post and new rider here. Thanks for hosting a great site full of information. I'm really happy to have joined. So on to my question.

I'm new to riding and have had my licence for about 4 months and have ridden around 800 miles or so on a Zontes Mantis 125cc buzz box to get some experience (as I was advised to here in the UK) but have come to truly loath its lack of pull (don't even think of going up a hill above 3rd and doing more than 35mph). It's almost a pushbike.

That said I come back with a smile on my face every time I ride it as I love riding. So on to my big question...

Is there a bike that's too big for me as a newb? I have fallen in love with the Victory Kingpin which is roughly 17x the engine capacity of my current bike. I am struggling to find a good reason not to buy it. Am I being stupid here? My instructor advised I get a 125cc then a 600-800cc before going for a bigger bike. I'm not riding super sports here its a cruiser.

For info I'm a 29, 6ft 3in tall male weighing 94kg (207lb).

Help a newb and let me know what you think!

Thanks,

Robb
You only go as fast as you twist the throttle! Take your time learning the new bike and you will be safe and come to be very pleased with your decision! :) Welcome from NJ. USA.
 

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You'll prob be fine. Your certainly big enuff to handle it. Going fast is easy...slow speed maneuvers need more patience. Practice makes near perfect. You'll be doing lock to lock slow speed turns before you know it.
 
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Hey everyone. First Post and new rider here. Thanks for hosting a great site full of information. I'm really happy to have joined. So on to my question.

I'm new to riding and have had my licence for about 4 months and have ridden around 800 miles or so on a Zontes Mantis 125cc buzz box to get some experience (as I was advised to here in the UK) but have come to truly loath its lack of pull (don't even think of going up a hill above 3rd and doing more than 35mph). It's almost a pushbike.

That said I come back with a smile on my face every time I ride it as I love riding. So on to my big question...

Is there a bike that's too big for me as a newb? I have fallen in love with the Victory Kingpin which is roughly 17x the engine capacity of my current bike. I am struggling to find a good reason not to buy it. Am I being stupid here? My instructor advised I get a 125cc then a 600-800cc before going for a bigger bike. I'm not riding super sports here its a cruiser.

For info I'm a 29, 6ft 3in tall male weighing 94kg (207lb).

Help a newb and let me know what you think!

Thanks,

Robb
I have a KP and it is so easy to ride.
The only thing I will say is get some highway bars on it so if you tip it over during slow speed maneuvering you won't do any real damage.
 

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Of all the bikes I have owned, the Kingpin is one of the top handling of them all. Being a newbie....I would suggest watching the speed. Its a powerful bike. Learn how to BRAKE properly, and don't hit corners fast until you learn how to lean into a curve and not try and make the handlebars turn with your arms. 2 very common mistakes for new riders.

Another common mistake is over using the rear brake. Use the front more in normal riding with less pressure on the rear.

Watch your downshifts too. Vic is different and takes a bit to learn. Downshifting too high speed with lock the tires up at times. Don't downshift at higher rpm's, read the manual on shift ranges.

At your size it should be fine. Its a powerful bike but can be a kitten if you ride normally and watch the 'gotchas' of basic riding skills.

And welcome to the group!
 

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Agree, respect the throttle. Start saving now for your upgrades and by the time you feel comfortable, you will be ready to go faster
 

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CONGRATS, have my first VICTORY, #21, and love it!
Maybe a throttle stop :badgrin:....gradually add as you get better. And I agree with hitting a parking lot...or class...low speed/turns is hardest to learn....and until you get better you have OUR permission to "duck walk" :icon_thumleft:
 

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The balance and center of gravity make the Kingpin a pretty easy bike to handle. I think a 1634cc Kingpin is easier to ride than an 883cc Sportster.
 

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Welcome aboard! I say go for it. As long as you have some throttle control, are big enough to handle the size of the bike (which it sounds like you are), and take your time learning the slow speed maneuvers, you will be fine.

Learn to rev match when down shifting and you won't have to worry about locking up the rear. Just blip the throttle enough to bring the RPMs up to where they will be in the next lower gear before letting the clutch out on a down shift.
 

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Get the bike. Just learn to ride. It's a lot more about technique than weight or strength. Practice and have fun doing it. Everytime I'm out I'll do some u turns, quick maneuvering for fun. And hopefully I get better the more I do it.
 

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Wont help you much, but Bruce lee once made this statement.....

"You must be shapeless, formless, like water. When you pour water in a cup, it becomes the cup. When you pour water in a bottle, it becomes the bottle. When you pour water in a teapot, it becomes the teapot. Water can drip and it can crash. Become like water my friend."

I feel like that sometimes when I am out riding....
 

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Welcome to the forum. Do you have your unlimited license yet? I am sorry to say that without that the Kingpin will be too much for what you are allowed. I don't know if they make power reduction accessories for a Kingpin to make you legal. I really like what I have seen of the Kingpins on line and in person, I ride a Vision, but all of the Victory bikes for a given year pretty much have the same engine and they are not low power engines. The Kingpin comes with either a 100 cubic inch,1634cc, engine or a 106, 1731cc, engine. The pin is a lot lighter bike than my Vision but that is both good and bad. It makes it easier to handle in tight locations but also means that the power/weight ratio is far higher than on my Vision. It weighs in at only about 300Kg vs. my Vision at about 400Kg.
The Victory engine is not the peaky engine you will find in a typical Japanese litre bike so that is a plus for a new rider because it makes that power a lot easier to control and chances are you will be able to keep the front wheel in contact with the ground in almost any circumstance.
 

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Please take a riding course. I've ridden since I was a kid and I learned things taking a course. The money you spend on that and on riding gear is worth every penny.
If you ever get a chance to ride dirt bike take it.
It'll teach you how to handle your bike when things are slippery.
 

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With your size, you certainly won't feel any intimidation sitting on the bike. Being able to sit flat-footed and knees bent adds a lot of confidence.

Victory power comes on in a very manageable form. Unless you're prone to serious whiskey throttle, the bike isn't going to try to get away from you. They're well-behaved bikes.

My younger brother is very close to your size, and also has limited riding experience having mostly ridden dirt and trail bikes. But he handles a Vegas admirably. I think you'll be just fine.
 

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I'll advise as if you were family... you should do what your gut says is right. Should you decide to go 'in between' first I certainly wouldn't fault that. Either way take the riding course~! Do that and in a year you will be as skilled as say 5+ years without it.
 

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As a relatively new rider (2 years) I'd say go for it. I just bought my Vegas and, while I too was a little apprehensive, it's everything I hoped it would be.... and more. It is the best balanced bike I've ever had the pleasure of riding and as long as you respect the throttle and your skill level, you will be fine.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Do you have your unlimited license yet? I am sorry to say that without that the Kingpin will be too much for what you are allowed. I don't know if they make power reduction accessories for a Kingpin to make you legal. I really like what I have seen of the Kingpins on line and in person, I ride a Vision, but all of the Victory bikes for a given year pretty much have the same engine and they are not low power engines. The Kingpin comes with either a 100 cubic inch,1634cc, engine or a 106, 1731cc, engine. The pin is a lot lighter bike than my Vision but that is both good and bad. It makes it easier to handle in tight locations but also means that the power/weight ratio is far higher than on my Vision. It weighs in at only about 300Kg vs. my Vision at about 400Kg.
The Victory engine is not the peaky engine you will find in a typical Japanese litre bike so that is a plus for a new rider because it makes that power a lot easier to control and chances are you will be able to keep the front wheel in contact with the ground in almost any circumstance.
Yup. And if you go further back you can get a KP with a 92ci. Got a buddy with an 04 KP with a 92 in it. I think they went to 100 in 06.
 
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