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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone removed the Vision fork caps while the forks were still on the bike? I have a fork spring and cartridge compressor tool already, just do not have the Victory 'adapter'.
Taz
 

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What type of forks do you have? The earlier Visions used Marz forks which were 45mm and were marked on the inside of the sliders with a raised M around where the caliper bolts to the fork leg. The newer style are KYB forks and are 46mm and do NOT have the M marking on the fork leg.
 

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From my service manual it is recommending the following:
You have the Type 2 forks which will require 550cc or 550mL of Victory fork oil type 2874568. I don't know the specs for the oil, so I can't advise, but I do know if you are using what Victory recommends, there should not be any warranty issues.
 

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I have removed caps on other bikes with the forks still on the bike, so I don't know why you can't on the Vision. Keep in mind thatthe caps will be under pressure from the fork springs. If you can jack the bike up on a lift where it is secure and you can allow the front forks to fully extend the springpressure will be the least on the caps. Use a shop towel on them to avoid marring your paint and go for it.
 

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So can you change fork oil by your self or should I say with out going to the dealer?
When I had my harley I had to go to the deal for fork oil change.
Haley tried the cartridge front "fork" on one side and gave it up after three years. Found it didn't make the front end work any better. I see that victory went back to springs again.Here is one for you.
Why do you have to change fork oil???

Its just used for damping no gears no really working parts it juds the springs and goes threw little holes for damping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

johnfrey said:
So can you change fork oil by your self or should I say with out going to the dealer?
When I had my harley I had to go to the deal for fork oil change.
Haley tried the cartridge front "fork" on one side and gave it up after three years. Found it didn't make the front end work any better. I see that victory went back to springs again.Here is one for you.
Why do you have to change fork oil???

Its just used for damping no gears no really working parts it juds the springs and goes threw little holes for damping.

[/quote/
Obviously, you have never seen or smelled dirty fork oil? Although there are no combustion by products in the fork oil there is plenty of dirt and moisture along with plenty of metal shavings that wear off the guide bushings.
Every bike manufacturer requires a fork oil change, most of them between 20-24k or every two years. I have seen plenty of used fork oil that looked like a grey metal 'slurry' that is why it MUST be changed periodically.
My question was never really answered, but in the meantime I have figured out that you must remove the handlebars in order to remove the Vision fork caps, or remove the forks from the triple tree, which I really don't want to do.
Taz
 

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Taz
I do agree with you that the oil looks really bad. But when I have changed my harley oil I could not see why. I think the oil looks bad after a thousand miles and mind you just cause it looks bad doesn't mean it is.
As for the bushings I have miked them after 75000 and have found 2 to 3 thousand wear from old ones to new ones. Its like belt wear I have had 50,000 miles on a belt and its still good. I think a lot of what the manufacture tells us to do is so they can make money of us the consumer.
Enough of that when harley had canister in the front forks you need a spacial tool to get the right amount of oil in. From what I see on a parts break down victory and harley use the same one so do you a tool to get all the oil in?
Thanks
John
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

I usually advise my customers to replace their fork bushings when the teflon coating has been worn away. Sometimes that can be many k's of miles and others not so much. Having been a professional mechanic all my adult life I have found it better to simply replace those parts which are designed to 'wear out' if I am already in there. Fork oil seals are designed to stand up to a certain amount of 'movement' between the fork tube and the slider, this ensures oil containment for the life of the bushings.
I don't like to go through all the trouble of removing the forks and taking them apart justto replace leaking seals, if you don't install new bushings at that point then you are just asking for trouble in the form of the new seals leaking prematurely.
Fork oil changes can be a real pain in the ass on some models. On the older Harleys with the air pressure dampening in the forksI would drain the oil out the bottom plugs and use the air line system to draw the new fluid back into the forks, that's how the dealer 'Flat Rate' techs do it!
On the models needing so called 'special tools' I just use a large syringe and inject oil into the cartridge from the top. You inject until the oil backs up and then just push the front end down to move the cartridge and the oil will go right down.
I change fork oil on Metric bikes by simply sucking it out from the top using my own "special tool" , works like a charm every time. Amazing what you can do with a Mity-Vac and a piece of brass tubing...
Taz
 
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