VOG Forum banner
41 - 60 of 61 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
516 Posts
How ironic!...how many times do we advise people to check terminals?
[/QUOTE]
Glad you got it fixed. A surprising cause, I'm gonna have to go back to the wiring diagram and map out the earthing runs of cable.
My suggested troubleshooting process would not have picked that up, as it concentrated on where the active cables went after the ignition switch.
Are you using a Motobat, with the stainless steel terminal bolts? Maybe swapping those out for the softer Yuasa style bolts might slow down the loosening. Or a small dab of grinding paste on the bolts during assembly.
Interesting post, as always.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,371 Posts
Paul, I noticed you have sold your Triumph. Am looking forward to checking out your videos . Will you be replacing it or just sticking with your CC Tour.
A guy in Florida saw my Triumph videos and knew that it was in mint condition and made me an offer for it, sight unseen. I originally kept the 2 bikes for a few years but found I wasn't riding the Triumph much anymore so decided to get a good amount of money for it. He paid everything, customs, transport, paperwork. It was my first time selling a motorized vehicle between countries. Anyway, I plan on sticking with just the Victory for now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
654 Posts
A guy in Florida saw my Triumph videos and knew that it was in mint condition and made me an offer for it, sight unseen. I originally kept the 2 bikes for a few years but found I wasn't riding the Triumph much anymore so decided to get a good amount of money for it. He paid everything, customs, transport, paperwork. It was my first time selling a motorized vehicle between countries. Anyway, I plan on sticking with just the Victory for now.
I've been eyeing a 1200cc Bonneville lately but doubt I will pull the trigger right now anyway but am going to check your videos out first chance for maintenance info. Love my Magnum as does my Buddy his CC tour Both of us have noticed our slow speed driving needs improvement as we both are no longer comfortable with two up riding at slow speeds on these heavy bikes with the passenger sitting up high. Was never an issue on the lighter bikes I've owned. Put a backrest on the Magnum this year to take my daughter for a few rides but have not done so yet. You quite comfortable in your two up excursions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,371 Posts
...You quite comfortable in your two up excursions?
I don't have any children, and the wife tried sitting on the back a few times but never really got into it. She always tried to fool me though, whenever she started a sentence with "Let's take the bike and..." I knew it was going to cost me either a fancy meal or a precious stone. After a while I would jokingly tell her that I couldn't afford to keep taking her for rides on the bike. Now she doesn't go anymore and I have a bit more money for gas and going 100 miles for french fries.

But your question about 2 up. I always rode extremely cautiously while she was on the back as she can't dive off the bike as fast as I can if anything were to happen. It's amazing how different you ride when you're solo than 2 up. Or at least it was for me as she was not very comfortable on it. These days I am always riding solo and my riding buddies are not retired yet as I am, so I am a lone wolf on the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,966 Posts
Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Great write up and glad everything sorta worked out.
But you bought the bike for adventure and it gave it to you... you should say thank you to it. Just kidding.
Will be interesting to find out what exactly caused this, and good for you for threatening to cancel all the insurance. It's the only way, it seems, to get people to move their a$$'s. They take your money pretty damn quick but don't move that fast when you need them.
Keep us updated.
UPDATE....
I got an automated "Rate our breakdown service" email a few days ago , in my own words I rated it ABYSMAL and 1 on a 1 to 10 rating
10 being the highest.
Rated phone people a low 1
and the tow truck driver Excellent 10.
Not surprisingly got a phone call two days ago with apologies and attempts at explanations which failed to move me....the person asked for me forgiveness!
I gave him the old line" God forgives,
I don't, have a word with him!"
Not too harsh given the circumstances I thought....

Yesterday another call from someone higher up, an underwriter, whatever they are...
Said he had reviewed what happened, pinpointed the points of error on their part and was making moves to change and educate.
He didn't ask for forgiveness, that sat well with me, he did ask what they could do to pacify me(not his exact words), put things right, you get the drift....
I said the insured value of my Kingpin needs to be adjusted up to reflect costs if repair or replacement should theft or damage occur.
He recognized the uniqueness of the bike and lifted insured value from 14K to 20 K , with no increase in premium costs(what I pay).
He informed me I'm on VIP status with them as I have 3 classic cars and 2 valuable motorcycles fully comprehensively covered and my Forester daily driver covered for damaging others.
I'm now willing to let the incident slide into the past .
and between you and me, I reckon I'll be checking battery terminals at every oil change!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,227 Posts
I've been eyeing a 1200cc Bonneville lately but doubt I will pull the trigger right now anyway but am going to check your videos out first chance for maintenance info. Love my Magnum as does my Buddy his CC tour Both of us have noticed our slow speed driving needs improvement as we both are no longer comfortable with two up riding at slow speeds on these heavy bikes with the passenger sitting up high. Was never an issue on the lighter bikes I've owned. Put a backrest on the Magnum this year to take my daughter for a few rides but have not done so yet. You quite comfortable in your two up excursions?
Funny the Bride refuses to ride. Strange when she was chasing me in the early 90's, she jump right on and even soloed a plane to impress me and now won't touch the controls...

Now I am not allowed to have a backseat and had to take it off. It does fit in the saddlebag though...

:pinshake: :fiddy:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,148 Posts
I must live a life of dyslexia because my wife always wants to go for a ride but sometimes I just don’t want to take her :angel4:
 
  • Like
  • Haha
Reactions: tyrfryr and Flyboy

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
I must live a life of dyslexia because my wife always wants to go for a ride but sometimes I just don't want to take her :angel4:
Can't take the passenger seat off the XC bikes so hard to get around that. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
654 Posts
I don't have any children, and the wife tried sitting on the back a few times but never really got into it. She always tried to fool me though, whenever she started a sentence with "Let's take the bike and..." I knew it was going to cost me either a fancy meal or a precious stone. After a while I would jokingly tell her that I couldn't afford to keep taking her for rides on the bike. Now she doesn't go anymore and I have a bit more money for gas and going 100 miles for french fries.

But your question about 2 up. I always rode extremely cautiously while she was on the back as she can't dive off the bike as fast as I can if anything were to happen. It's amazing how different you ride when you're solo than 2 up. Or at least it was for me as she was not very comfortable on it. These days I am always riding solo and my riding buddies are not retired yet as I am, so I am a lone wolf on the road.
In my younger day my wife went everywhere with me on my 850 Norton. Both of us were quite a bit lighter and the Commando was close to just half as heavy as the Magnum. Just don't feel comfortable at all during low speed two up maneuvering. Ordered the Jerry Paladino (ex Cop) video and am anxious to view it. Good that your still riding in your retirement. Thought of retiring but I work a real cushy job 4 days (Monday to Thursday) a week and 3 days a week during the summer . I still enjoy it as I've not had any major health issues yet. If I were to retire and get a part time job it would be more demanding on me than staying put. When I come to that big decision I'll not work anymore anywhere except around my properety. Always enjoy your videos. Take care
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,577 Posts
A short story similar. Bought an '89 Jag XJ6 from a retired cop once for about $1500. Had a couple oil leaks around the spark plugs, the tubes would fill with oil. First stop was to a specialty shop to get that fixed. They replaced the main gaskets but not the little rings for the spark plug tubes, so it continued to leak. Ended up taking it to Firestone, they found the missing gaskets, replaced them half the cost of the other shop. Anyway, a day or 2 later, it started acting up electronically, windows would open/close, sunroof, wipers, radio went on/off. Took it back, they said probably something with one of the 3 aftermarket alarms installed so ripped them all out. Week later, same thing, took it back, couldn't find the problem. Ran another few days no issues then again acted up. This cycled for a month or 2.

One day, I'm on this road coming to a traffic light, take my foot off the gas, apply brake, but it's fighting me, engine is revving hard, take foot of brake, car starts accelerating like crazy. I pop the shifter into neutral and turn the ignition off, get to the light, turn key on, no dash, no lights, no sign of life. Pushed it around the corner, glad it was a slight decline.

Popped the hood, and just nosed around in there but I smell burning plastic so I'm looking around, feeling around, sticking my nose where I could to try and find the culprit. Finally, noticed the throttle cable was crusty and melted at the throttle body. Grabbed some random tool and scraped as much of it away as I could then just worked the cable in the housing but it wasn't smooth. The plastic sheath had melted down onto the braided cable and seized it preventing the throttle from closing. I'm like 20 years old and inexperienced at the time, but I had a feeling it was something electrical causing a short-circuit. Babied it home, with my hand on the key the entire 20 miles.

Worked fine for another week or 2 and I decided to do some routine maintenance at the GF's Apartment. Wanted to change out the fuel filter, battery, air and cabin filters, throttle cables, battery and plugs. Drive it up on the curb to get room to crawl under the passenger side to access the fuel filter. While down there, lots of crap is dropping on my face when I touch anything, burnt oil, road grime, etc. I feel something brush my shoulder, look over and see a braided copper strap hanging down, bolt nearly falling out of the eye. Took about 5 minutes to find where it went. Cleaned the threads reinstalled in bottom of engine block.

Ran about 6 weeks after this with no issues. Then the coolant return hose popped off the engine block on the freeway and the engine blew. But the electrical issue was solved anyway.

It's interesting that of all of the things in/around the engine, battery, etc. it was the throttle cable that provided a path, heated up quick, melted the plastic and caused me to nearly wreck the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,246 Posts
A short story similar. Bought an '89 Jag XJ6 from a retired cop once for about $1500. Had a couple oil leaks around the spark plugs, the tubes would fill with oil. First stop was to a specialty shop to get that fixed. They replaced the main gaskets but not the little rings for the spark plug tubes, so it continued to leak. Ended up taking it to Firestone, they found the missing gaskets, replaced them half the cost of the other shop. Anyway, a day or 2 later, it started acting up electronically, windows would open/close, sunroof, wipers, radio went on/off. Took it back, they said probably something with one of the 3 aftermarket alarms installed so ripped them all out. Week later, same thing, took it back, couldn't find the problem. Ran another few days no issues then again acted up. This cycled for a month or 2.

One day, I'm on this road coming to a traffic light, take my foot off the gas, apply brake, but it's fighting me, engine is revving hard, take foot of brake, car starts accelerating like crazy. I pop the shifter into neutral and turn the ignition off, get to the light, turn key on, no dash, no lights, no sign of life. Pushed it around the corner, glad it was a slight decline.

Popped the hood, and just nosed around in there but I smell burning plastic so I'm looking around, feeling around, sticking my nose where I could to try and find the culprit. Finally, noticed the throttle cable was crusty and melted at the throttle body. Grabbed some random tool and scraped as much of it away as I could then just worked the cable in the housing but it wasn't smooth. The plastic sheath had melted down onto the braided cable and seized it preventing the throttle from closing. I'm like 20 years old and inexperienced at the time, but I had a feeling it was something electrical causing a short-circuit. Babied it home, with my hand on the key the entire 20 miles.

Worked fine for another week or 2 and I decided to do some routine maintenance at the GF's Apartment. Wanted to change out the fuel filter, battery, air and cabin filters, throttle cables, battery and plugs. Drive it up on the curb to get room to crawl under the passenger side to access the fuel filter. While down there, lots of crap is dropping on my face when I touch anything, burnt oil, road grime, etc. I feel something brush my shoulder, look over and see a braided copper strap hanging down, bolt nearly falling out of the eye. Took about 5 minutes to find where it went. Cleaned the threads reinstalled in bottom of engine block.

Ran about 6 weeks after this with no issues. Then the coolant return hose popped off the engine block on the freeway and the engine blew. But the electrical issue was solved anyway.

It's interesting that of all of the things in/around the engine, battery, etc. it was the throttle cable that provided a path, heated up quick, melted the plastic and caused me to nearly wreck the car.
Why do the Brits drink warm beer? Lucas builds their refrigerators.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,148 Posts
^^^^^^ That’s an oldy from across the pond & still funny
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,483 Posts
In my younger day my wife went everywhere with me on my 850 Norton. Both of us were quite a bit lighter and the Commando was close to just half as heavy as the Magnum. Just don't feel comfortable at all during low speed two up maneuvering. Ordered the Jerry Paladino (ex Cop) video and am anxious to view it. Good that your still riding in your retirement. Thought of retiring but I work a real cushy job 4 days (Monday to Thursday) a week and 3 days a week during the summer . I still enjoy it as I've not had any major health issues yet. If I were to retire and get a part time job it would be more demanding on me than staying put. When I come to that big decision I'll not work anymore anywhere except around my properety. Always enjoy your videos. Take care
The Ride Like a Pro videos are great. Jerry also has a YouTube channel where he posts short videos every week. He covers a wider range of topics but a lot of them show riders in his classes doing things right and wrong with Jerry narrating. The three main points he reinforces over and over are:
1. Head and Eyes, you'll go where you're looking
2. The Clutch Friction Zone, this is vital in slow speed maneuvers
3. Slight Rear Brake Pressure, to stabilize the bike in slow speed maneuvers

Sadly, many decades long riders still don't know these basics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,148 Posts
Running 60 mph down the highways easy, it’s the 1-9 mph 2 up in off cambered parking lots that requires skill, practice, practice, practice
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
654 Posts
The Ride Like a Pro videos are great. Jerry also has a YouTube channel where he posts short videos every week. He covers a wider range of topics but a lot of them show riders in his classes doing things right and wrong with Jerry narrating. The three main points he reinforces over and over are:
1. Head and Eyes, you'll go where you're looking
2. The Clutch Friction Zone, this is vital in slow speed maneuvers
3. Slight Rear Brake Pressure, to stabilize the bike in slow speed maneuvers

Sadly, many decades long riders still don't know these basics.
So right there. Purchased that video a little while back and if followed can save you from some embarrassment when touring with other couples.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,247 Posts
Yea I have to admit at times my XCT is a handful at very slow walking speeds. With the RDL double saddle my wife and I sit higher up with unfortunately raised the center of gravity. Slow speed maneuvers pulling into a gas station with uneven pavement and potholes raised the anxiety level to a 9. Hauling butt through the mountains on twisty roads is nothing.

At 64 I realize I will need either a lighter bike or a bike with much lower center of gravity like a GW. Wife rides 90% of the time with me. Always has. Goes on all our rallies that take us through many states and frankly I wouldn't enjoy those trips without her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
670 Posts
I too barely get to ride alone and when I do I am much more aggressive then when I have my S/O in the saddle. Not that she would complain at all as she likes riding and herself drives very fast and likes loud pipes more than I do - but I feel much more responsible when I have a passengers life in my hands.
Told her I might Bagger Vroomhilda to see if it lightens the load with removing the tour box and any excess weight until I get around to seriously consider selling Vroomhilda. One day, but not today.
 
41 - 60 of 61 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top