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They look nice but already having a set of FOBO I'm going to stick with them for the other bike just to keep them in one app.

$75 isn't a bad price.
 

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Do you need to be concerned about the tires being out of balance after installing?
I installed my Fobo senders after new tires were installed.

FOBO Bike - FOBO

I used Counteract tire balancing beads. Dynabeads are fine as well, so the tires always stay balanced.

I've never heard of BLU Technology sensors but they look the same as Fobo.
 
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I have the Fobo system and it works fine. I tried looking up some info on the Blu Technology system and can't find much except this which one review says the Blu system only works while moving which is not good.
BLU TPMS - Android Apps on Google Play us

As far as tire balancing I use Ride On balancer and sealant. It is more expensive than Dyna Beads but may seal a small puncture if you get one in the middle section of the tire. I say may as I haven't had a puncture yet. I can tell you that the Ride on worked in this video but I have seen reviews where people say it didn't work. It will not work with internal TPMS but does work with the external type.

 

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If you get them keep us posted. I too have the FOBO's and have been su8per pleased with them. I bought a good gauge at the same time to double check the TPMS's and they've always been right on with each other.
 

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My Experience, Doran:

I installed and used the Doran 360M TPMS on my (now sold) XCT for about three years. I wrote a review of the system, including what I think is a decent overview of TPMS, for webBikeWorld, back in 2014:

Doran 360M TPMS Review - webBikeWorld

The Doran is a more complete system, in that it includes its own display module. It's theoretically a good system, because you don't need a phone, the display module is waterproof, and the display can be powered by an on-bike 12V source.

In practice, however, not so good.

The sensor batteries cannot be user-replaced (Doran asserts that that's for sensor integrity). And don't last nearly as long as Doran claims. And those sensors are expensive to replace when this happens.

Further, the sensor-to-module communication is not Bluetooth, and sometimes gets finicky (thankfully, this mostly happens when the bike is parked, i.e., the wheels are not spinning).

Last, the system is fairly expensive to start with.

My Experience, FOBO:

So when I got my next bike (in 2016, a 2008 Suzuki Burgman 650), I waited for a tire change at the start of the 2017, and installed a FOBO system.

Another frequent contributor to webBikeWorld, Brandon Jackson, wrote a comprehensive review of the FOBO system in 2015:

FOBO Bike Review - webBikeWorld

At the end of that review, you'll see a couple of comments I made ("B.P."), in 2015 and in 2017. In the first one, I noted some limitations of the FOBO system, such as needing a phone, and -- if you're interested in real-time alerts -- a place to put it (in which case you may be concerned about rain), or perhaps Bluetooth helmet speakers.

In the comment from 2017, I admitted defeat, and noted that I joined the FOBO crowd.

In truth, I don't concern myself with real-time alerts (at least not yet), and don't have helmet speakers of any sort. I use the FOBO for pre-ride air checks. Saves getting down on the floor, particularly for checking hard-to-get-at rear-wheel valve stems.

And adding air, which I'll get to in a minute, is actually less frequent. Once you get used to checking air without losing a molecule of it -- you're checking remotely, without unscrewing or attaching anything -- you can see how well tires hold air. Yep, they go down or up a PSI or two as the weather fluctuates from week to week, but if you can see that variation go up and down, and mostly ignore. Of course, as the seasons change, you may need to add air in the fall, for instance. And the tires still lose maybe a PSI per month or so.

So it's been my experience that I need to add air less than I used to, because checking is so easy that you get a feel for changes with the weather, and because there is no air loss when checking.

Metal Valve Stems:

You should definitely use metal valve stems, because of the added stress of having sensors at the end. Almost every vendor of external sensors either recommends that or flat-out requires that.

You'll see that BLU does a disservice here -- inexcusable, IMHO -- in a picture at the top of the page http://techbyblu.com/assets/flyer-blu-tpms_01.pdf

So, if you happen to have rubber valve stems (although I'm not aware of any Victory that came stock with them, but I'm mostly familiar with the Cross bikes), wait until you change tires, and then have metal valve stems installed, before adding sensors.

Better Yet, T-Valves:

FOBO (and, yes, these are available elsewhere, if you look hard enough) will sell you T-valves. Take a look at their accessory page:

FOBO Accessories - FOBO

This is what I bought, when I bought the FOBO system, and I strongly recommend them.

They allow you to add air (when that becomes necessary), from the side, without unscrewing the sensors (which are mounted on the top, as shown in those pics). This, in turn, has two advantages:

1) It allows you to use -- and then not mess with -- the little locking nuts, underneath the sensors. These provide a modest security increase (although if someone steals the sensors, they won't work for the thief, because they're associated with your userID), and a little more peace of mind that the sensors will stay put.

2) The batteries will last longer. FOBO notes in its user manual (page 9 at https://my-fobo.com/uploads/fobobike/FOBOBikeUserGuidever2.6.pdf ) that "Removal & screw-on of sensors" affects battery life. (As an aside, note that you can even change the button battery in a FOBO sensor, with the sensor still on the valve stem -- been there, done that.)

Balance:

According to BLU (page 5, http://techbyblu.com/assets/external-tpms-user-manual-eng.pdf ), its sensors weigh 9.5 oz. The FOBO sensors weigh 11.5 oz (page 31, https://my-fobo.com/uploads/fobobike/FOBOBikeUserGuidever2.6.pdf ). And the T-Valve is probably heavier than that (FOBO doesn't seem to list its weight, and I forgot to put one on a scale, before having them installed.)

On my XCT, I had balance beads in the tires when I added the Doran sensors. Later on, I switched over to Centramatic wheel balancers. Given that, and the massive weight of the wheels, I certainly didn't need to worry about balance.

On the Burgman, as I mentioned, I waited for a tire change. I had the shop (I don't have the any tire-changing equipment of my own) install the T-Valves and then screw on the sensors, and then balance the tires. (The plastic lock-nuts are negligible.) That is, yep, I had the tires balanced as if everything was all set for real riding.

If you don't have beads or Centramatics, I would recommend this route, i.e., wait for a tire change, and have the wheels/tires/stems/sensors balanced all at once.

FOBO:

If I were doing this again, i.e., buying a third TPMS, I'd stick with the FOBOs. They seem to me to be slightly more sophisticated than the BLU TPMS, in terms of both alerts, monitoring, and apps. And the documentation also seems more complete.

And they've been around for a few years now, and they seem to know what they're doing. I know, that's not very scientific, but it's what I believe. Part of that is the promptness and thoroughness when I emailed FOBO a couple of times now. (In one email, I asked about the battery-life display on the phone, and learned that a replacement battery may not show its full-life capacity until some averaging has been going on. In another email, I asked about sensor accuracy, which, as is typical of TPMS vendors, I couldn't find anywhere; I was informed that each "sensor comes with an accuracy of +\- 0.4 psi, and the resolution is 0.2 psi.")

The FOBO is c. $25 more than the BLU system for two sensors. And FOBO has a package that adds the T-Valves (which I really like, you may have gathered) for $115. So I'd go with that.

Unlike my experience with the Doran TPMS, I have had no problems at all with the FOBO system. And it was certainly a relative pleasure just replacing a button battery, instead of buying a new sensor.

And the FOBO reminds me that it's still doing its job every once in a while, when I enter my man cave -- my garage, which picks up house heat only marginally, though two common walls -- with my phone, and the temperature has dropped big-time lately. It will note that the pressures have fallen below my thresholds, as the snow continues to fall outside.

Hope this provides some useful real-world insights into this topic.
 
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My last couple phones have been Samsung and waterproof. I use a X grip to mount it to my bar and never worry about it getting wet.
 
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