VOG Forum banner
1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2005 victory Vegas with the 92CI engine. I just replaced the drive belt as the previous one snapped. I followed the instructions in the owners manual when aligning the wheel but for some reason once I start moving the rear tire forward, the belt tracks all the way to the left. I think its also rubbing as well. I've been adjusting and readjusting for hours and cant get it to stay centered on the pulley. Any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
Are you talking about the front drive sprocket off the engine...or the rear wheel sprocket? The front drive sprocket is based off the mounting of the engine to the frame, and should be in decent alignment with the entire motorcycle. If there is a problem, then look for a busted frame mount bracket.

So...in reference to the rear sprocket, I would rather try and align the rear wheel than concentrate on the belt. With the bike standing full upright (you can use a number of methods to secure the bike) use two strings to determine the current alignment of the rear wheel. The strings have to gently touch the rear tire, and be straight...and be done on both sides. Each string has to touch the front and rear points of the rear tire...on both the left and right side. Then you can see if they are equally spaced apart relative to the front wheel/tire mid point. If equal spacing apart, relative to the front wheel/tire, then the real wheel is aligned.

You can use the string method when the bike is resting on the side stand, but it's more difficult to get proper measurements. I secure my bike in an upward position by either using two step-ladders on each side, or by strapping it to some weight-lifting equipment. Best to have the bike exactly vertical.

See this starting at the 2:30 mark. Despite what he says, done properly and carefully, the string method is an excellent procedure.


Once the rear wheel is in proper alignment, then adjust the adjustment nuts "equally" on each side to adjust belt to proper tension. What deflection spec are you going to use?

When adjusting the rear wheel, axle nut needs to be "snug" not loose or tight...and the adjusters only move (or pull) the wheel axle backward...so to move the wheel forward loosen the adjustment nut and take a wood dowel to hit the back of the axle to move it forward. Be aware that when you tighten the axle nut, the axle on the nut side can be forced toward the rear, so prevent that or else the wheel will be forced out of alignment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
Also, if you have a severe alignment issue, my guess is that you have an incorrect spacer on the rear wheel. Perhaps the left and right side spacers were switched in their correct position, thus pushing the rear wheel over to the left.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Im talking about the front sprocket. It seems no matter how I adjust the alignment the belt tracks all the way to the left of the front sprocket. heres a photo to better illustrate. I was using the tick marks to align the bike but even with the tick marks adjusted perfectly this happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Also, if you have a severe alignment issue, my guess is that you have an incorrect spacer on the rear wheel. Perhaps the left and right side spacers were switched in their correct position, thus pushing the rear wheel over to the left.
I have the longer wheel spacer on the side with the sprocket and the smaller on the other side. is that right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well I used the string alignment method, everything checked out... tick marks lined up, spacers were in the right spot, yet the belt continued to move towards the inside of the sprocket. finally gave up and said screw it, so I took it for a ride..... and I don't know what did it, but after riding for about 3-5 miles I looked at the belt and it was perfectly centered on the sprocket and has stayed there since so....... I guess the heat of the engine caused it to finally fall into place? I dunno but thanks for your guys help I really appreciate it.

I was very close to swearing off belt drive bikes once and for all and get a shaft drive lol (m109r's are sick af)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,971 Posts
Well I used the string alignment method, everything checked out... tick marks lined up, spacers were in the right spot, yet the belt continued to move towards the inside of the sprocket. finally gave up and said screw it, so I took it for a ride..... and I don't know what did it, but after riding for about 3-5 miles I looked at the belt and it was perfectly centered on the sprocket and has stayed there since so....... I guess the heat of the engine caused it to finally fall into place? I dunno but thanks for your guys help I really appreciate it.

I was very close to swearing off belt drive bikes once and for all and get a shaft drive lol (m109r's are sick af)
Well, that is why one does it cold and should track right rotating forward and left when rotated backwards. Sounds like you got it... All adjustments at that point. Done on left adjuster, don't know the string method.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
My guess is that it was a new belt and needed to be used some in order to settle into its position. The heat of the engine expands the front drive sprocket because it gets very hot, and it also transfers heat to the belt. My rear sprocket also gets warm, but not hot. Nonetheless, the belt will get significantly tighter when hot vs how it is when cold. Belt should be checked after 500 miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
The belt on my 2013 vegas just wanders all over the place, from one side of rhe rear pulley to the other. I've done it all, and it's just the way it works. I squawks at low speed, and I just live with it. I've even put the bike on the lift, and started and run it in gear, and tried to micro adjust it. I think the problem is the rear pulley is manufactured so piss poorly, that it is out of round. One of these days, I'll put a new pulley on it. Aftermarket of course. Victory should be ashamed of themselves. I also noticed there is a slightly different procedure in the shop manual than in the owners manual, but it doesn't make any difference.

The bike rides fine on the road, and all is well. i did adjust the tension down to 10 lbs cold instead of the 6 in the manual, as the belt gets so tight when it is hot, and really loads up the front pulley bearing. It seems to help.

I'm disappointed with this belt drive system, but really think my rear pulley is the culprit. I can make micro adjustments and the belt will ride either slightly to one edge or the other. I've got it the best I can get, so I just ride it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I had issue with belt drifting to right on front pulley, causing it to rub on front pulley cover..
I removed wheel and measured from center of swing arm pivot bolt to opening slide adj on swing arm. Noticed left side was 1/16 inch less not too bad. However a half turn would compensate. Equal amounts of turns left and right side still belt would drift to right. I put 2 shim washers on wheel pulley side spacer and adjusted again and BOOM belt runs right in middle with proper tension. Wheel is 100 % aligned . I also grinded inner cover for front pulley just to insure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
HI David. You are not the first person to have an issue with the front sprocket and cover rubbing. I have not experienced that though.

On the adjustments at the rear wheel for alignment: Once you get the belt tension set correctly, and the marks lined up as well as you can, you don’t touch the right side adjusters again. if you do, you will upset the belt tension.

So and adjustments to make the belt track left or right, are made with the left side adjuster only. turning it in will move the belt towards the outside of the pulley and out will move it towards the inside. You can’t believe those marks on the swing arm. They are totally worthless, and they get you in the ballpark and that’s about it.

Cheers
John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Hi John

What we do to right adjuster we must do to the left adjusters to keep axle and rear wheel perfectly straight from starting point of swing arm slide openings. If we make more or less turns on left side unfortunately tire won't be straight. By placing the shims on right side spacer I was able to make belt center at front pulley with out compromising the alignment of rear wheel. Axle must be straight . Victory's are well made motorcycles. Safe riding John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,463 Posts
What we do to right adjuster we must do to the left adjusters to keep axle and rear wheel perfectly straight from starting point of swing arm slide openings.
This assumes that the axle was aligned in the first place, that the axle slots are equal, and the marks on the swingarm are correct. Those could be unwise assumptions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Half Crazy

I am not assuming
I measured center point of swing arm pivot bolts to beginning of swing arm axle adjustment slots both sides With rear tire off.... Left side was less than 1/16 to 1/32 off as I stated in my first post I compensated for this. Again Axle must be straight. Been riding long time I would not chance riding on a rear wheel that is not centered now that is WISE . Safe riding Half Crazy have a blessed day
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
301 Posts
Yep, I have to agree with Half Crazy. If you adjust both bolts, you are assuming that you alignment is ok. However adjusting both bolts only changes tension, not belt position on the pulley. To move the belt from one side to center or whatever, you have to adjust only one side, the left, to avoid messing up the belt tension.

I understand better now about installing shims to move the pulley to one side or the other. This is something I hadn’t thought about, and I appreciate the advice there. Thanks David. However, my belt rides right in the center of the front pulley. It’s the back one that drives me crazy.

Unfortunately, there is little you can do to provide accurate wheel alignment and allow the wheel to actually be centered, as any change to the stop bolts on either side, moves the wheel and pulley. It’s not a great system, and if the bike was built with any kind of offset, you are screwed. My bike pulls to the right when I take my hands off the bars. I can’t do anything to prevent it. I have owned a total of 12 bikes in my life, and this bike is the only one I have not been able to ride hands off in a straight line.

Last week when I replaced my belt, I took the time, with the bike up on the hydraulic lift, to get the alignment nailed down. It took a lot of time and patience to get it aligned per the procedure in the service manual. This procedure is different to the one in the owners manual. It works, but you have to make a lot of tiny adjustments, and also rotate the wheel and watch where the belt is moving to for quite a long time. Just a few turns doesn’t do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Yep, I have to agree with Half Crazy. If you adjust both bolts, you are assuming that you alignment is ok. However adjusting both bolts only changes tension, not belt position on the pulley. To move the belt from one side to center or whatever, you have to adjust only one side, the left, to avoid messing up the belt tension.

I understand better now about installing shims to move the pulley to one side or the other. This is something I hadn't thought about, and I appreciate the advice there. Thanks David. However, my belt rides right in the center of the front pulley. It's the back one that drives me crazy.

Unfortunately, there is little you can do to provide accurate wheel alignment and allow the wheel to actually be centered, as any change to the stop bolts on either side, moves the wheel and pulley. It's not a great system, and if the bike was built with any kind of offset, you are screwed. My bike pulls to the right when I take my hands off the bars. I can't do anything to prevent it. I have owned a total of 12 bikes in my life, and this bike is the only one I have not been able to ride hands off in a straight line.

Last week when I replaced my belt, I took the time, with the bike up on the hydraulic lift, to get the alignment nailed down. It took a lot of time and patience to get it aligned per the procedure in the service manual. This procedure is different to the one in the owners manual. It works, but you have to make a lot of tiny adjustments, and also rotate the wheel and watch where the belt is moving to for quite a long time. Just a few turns doesn't do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
John

The owner and repair manuals and dealer all agree with me . Axle MUST BE STRAIGHT. Equal amounts of turns from start point of sliders. Like I said I compensated for the 1/32 that's was off
Bike rides straight as an arrow. Belt tension is on the money. Research the manuals and ask local dealer or mechanic. Safe riding John have a blessed day
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,463 Posts
The owner and repair manuals and dealer all agree with me . Axle MUST BE STRAIGHT.
No one is disagreeing with that... the question is the method used to determine 'straight'.
1) No one cares what the dealer has to say. Dealers almost never get the alignment and tension correct.
2) If you can measure what you measured, why not measure from the center of the swing arm to the center of the axle?
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top