Advice Victory Cross Country for 1st Bike | Victory Motorcycles: Motorcycle Forums

Advice Victory Cross Country for 1st Bike

Discussion in 'Victory General Discussion' started by Jester84, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. Jester84

    Jester84 New Member

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    Hi guys,

    I am 33 and about to take the motorcycle course and buy a bike. I have rode dirt bikes and my buddies rice bikes in the past lol.

    I want a touring bike one I can go on the long rides with the GF. Why I was looking at the Cross county model. Also they seem to be priced better than Harley.

    I have had people say get a vegas or something smaller to start.

    Just seeing what people think, what you love/hate about the bike.

    There seems to be good deals on the 2016s in my area
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2017
  2. MagVic CCT

    MagVic CCT Well-Known Member

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    If you have some experience, then the transition won't be too involved, but, it is a big(er) bike and the trick will be getting used to that "different" geometry and holding the weight. Is it doable? Yes. Is it good for you to do it........try one first and that will tell you a lot. On the plus side, these things ride, turn, corner better than most of similar size, so you will find it easier to "throw around" than anything else in the genre. And the CC and CCT and Vision have the added feature of the guards that won't let it fall all the way over. So a drop won't become a major issue.

    If you think you can learn it before it kills you, the do it. Just know that you'll be taking your time and don't rush the process. Parking lots are your friend. Good luck.
     
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  3. Chopperbob

    Chopperbob Active Member

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    While it is great that you have dirt bike experience and riding crotch rockets, piloting a new to you, 900+ lb. touring bike with your girlfriend on the back, is a handful, even for experienced riders.

    Do yourself and your girlfriend a favor and go touring by yourself to gain experience. Once you get out, in many different conditions, then take your girlfriend out starting with short trips.

    Riding a passenger is a whole new ball game. Getting a new bike, being a new street rider, with a passenger could get you in over your head real fast.

     
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  4. Jester84

    Jester84 New Member

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    Hey that's for the input. Yeah not looking to start off crazy. But the gf eventually wants to come and I want to do long drives and trips. I am thinking why waste money small and work up to a bike that can handle all day rides. Plus the storage etc.

    I am 5'10 and 190lbs

    I would of had bikes sooner just figured wait till I was mature enough. Not become one of those punks on a rice rocket lol

    Plus the price on a like new 2016 CC ATM I couldn't touch a harley of the same caliber options etc Harley's are about 5k more. And I hear lots of people say they are better bikes
     
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  5. HenryT

    HenryT Active Member

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    Could not agree more. Full size touring bikes with a passenger is a totally different world than a dirt bike.
     
  6. Jester84

    Jester84 New Member

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    Oh yes this is the plan of course....I will be solo for awhile. I just don't see the point of working the way up. Why not learn the bike I will be riding one day on a trip. Plus the price is right on the c.c and starting small selling or trading up and up seems like a waste.

    She or anyone else wouldn't be on the bike till I trust someone in my hands.

    Why I even waited so long to get a bike. Waited to trust my own hands lol
     
  7. Jester84

    Jester84 New Member

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    People have suggested to get a vegas which I do like as well. Just a 163lbs difference. Would you say it's better to spend a season on that then go to the C.C next year ? I can pick a decent one up for 4-6k wouldn't hurt the pockets and trade it in after ?
     
  8. MagVic CCT

    MagVic CCT Well-Known Member

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    Starting with a smaller bike is always a better option, especially if you have limited riding experience. Don't try to talk yourself into of out of doing the smart thing here. Make an honest assesment of your skills and capibilities. You can learn to ride a bigger bike first, but it will be a slower process and will involve a lot of dedication and attention on your part. You may not enjoy the process as much, but you might find the rewards to be better.

    I all comes down to what you know about yourself, not what someone else can tell you about yourself. I started out after a long absence from bikes with a Sabre. It was big for me at the time, and a bit top heavy compared to the CCT. But, it was smaller and lighter. For the first three or four thousand miles it was something of a hand full. And it was probably a full 5K miles until I even considered a passenger. This will change everything (as has already been said). We didn't go far, and we worked ourselves up to the task. It wasn't until I got a second bike that was bigger and more capable that we began traveling. So, go slow, enjoy each ride, don't set any artificial dates or deadlines. Just know when you are ready for the "next" thing by knowing your own skills and if you are improving. Every step you take will set you back a little, but it's just a new learning curve you have to overcome. Time and practice, and watch other riders with some time, and check out instructional videos and listen very carefully to what they say.

    But , don't let someone else decide for you what only you know you can or can not do.
     
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  9. Eternalshrubbery

    Eternalshrubbery Member

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    I had a dirt bike for a while. Bought a 87 Virago that I put maybe 2,000 miles on. Had an FZ6R that we shared as a family, maybe 1,000 miles on it myself. A sportster 1200 that I put 2,000 miles on. I liked them all but, never fell in love. This was over the course of 10 years.

    I test drove a Cross Country Tour and bought one week's later. I've put 3,500 miles on it in 2 months and I'm leaving for a 2,000 mile road trip in a couple days with the ol lady. I never felt so at home than on that bike. For reference, I'm 5'11 about 220lbs. This is all anecdotal and I do have more experience than you on the road but, I feel it's all about how the bike fits you. Maybe take a Vegas on a test drive, if you feel comfortable, take out a Cross Country. Take it slow. Make sure you're in your comfort level and buy what fits you best. I own one if the heaviest bikes and can rip it thru the corners better than my sportster. I wish I would have bought one of these in the first place. Still working on the slow maneuvers though :)
     
  10. Bujee1

    Bujee1 Well-Known Member

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    My first bike was a Suzuki M109r, in 2010, My next bike for touring was a Yamaha 950. Which only lasted 3 months before trading it for my 2011 Cross Country. My point is if you learn on a big bike, a smaller bike won't do.
    I'm also 5'10". I never rode and motorized bike before the age of 52.
    Get a XCT. Practice in parking lots, then office parks, then freeways then twisties. Then start all over again with a passenger. You will be fine.
     
  11. MagVic CCT

    MagVic CCT Well-Known Member

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    M109 is a lot of bike to learn on. I recall my first really big V and the first time I had to run up a rocky driveway. Every time I hit a rock, it caused a little extra twist of the throttle. Realized right there that learning absolute throttle control was going to become very important. :22yikes:
     
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  12. Jester84

    Jester84 New Member

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    Yeah that's my main debate is to start small and flip bikes. Or go for the bike that is comfortable on a 5 hr ride with the boys I am not regretting and have the luxuries that a CC has and take my time and pretty much keep that bike for ever.

    I know to take things easy and slow and progress same as riding any bike and a passenger changes things for sure.
     
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  13. Bujee1

    Bujee1 Well-Known Member

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    My wife had a no upgrade policy so I bought the most bike I could afford.
     
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  14. jedi-mcfly

    jedi-mcfly Well-Known Member

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    @Jester84 ...go and test drive the 2016's at the dealer... test drive them all, the vegas, hammer, XC ...and not little test ride, 30 miles or better :) they want your cash ... and then you will be in the know
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2017
  15. BrotherWind

    BrotherWind Well-Known Member

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    Why start with number 2, might as well go to the top and get a Vision. :angel4:. But seriously a touring bike may be desireable but there's an awful lot of fun you'd be missing out on if you start with a big tourer. You may not even be able to appreciate the ride truly because of lack of perspective. I would suggest a C50T or ??? for 2 or 3 G's and that will get you and your girl cruising. Just my humble opinion.
     

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