VOG Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It might seem early to some for a complete tear down, but it was 20 degrees outside for about 2 weeks I needed something exciting to do. When out in cold weather I would get some squeaking from the rear end when sitting on the bike, plus I needed to replace the rear tire. Upon inspection the bearings, bushings and seals were all in good shape. Victory actually used grease on these parts. (My Vmax left the factory with dry head bearings!) There are 4 ball and socket joints, 1 at the lowering link, 1 at the shock, and 2 on the swing arm. The shock joint is sealed so it was good. The other 3 joints were all dry and dirty. The swing arm axle was in the early stages of corrosion on the right side. I cleaned up the axle and applied water proof grease, thoroughly cleaned the ball and socket joints and packed them with water proof grease. These joints really swivel around nicely now. (I think i found the squeak issue) added more Moly grease to the needle bearings in the shock saddle and swing arm for good measure and reassembled.
Going back together I installed the rear tire per HC recommendation, never touching the axle adjusters. I rigged a ratchet strap around the tire and pulled it tight against the adjusters and tighten the axle nut. Perfect!! Belt is still the correct tension and it rides centered. Maybe just a tad left, it always seems to go left just a little. That was easy!
Rear suspension is now smooth and quiet.
Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design Automotive lighting
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
Did you get to look at the swinging arm bearings, I have 35K on my XC they feel ok

But when I took my 03 Vegas apart after 4 years the swinging arm needle bearings where starting to rust and the seals had go hard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, I did look and feel the swing arm needle bearings, they were covered in grease and looked good. The sealed ball bearings in the right side I assumed were still good to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
hope you added a grease fitting to the rocker so you could give it a shot once a year
Honestly didn't think about it for two reasons. 1 it's not a dirt bike and lives in the shop when not ridden. 2 The needle bearings were clean and still had grease on them after almost 5 years. If the shock makes it another 5 years, I'll replace the seals re-grease and never touch the rocker again.
But I must say that is a good idea, and there is a channel between the needle bearings where a zerk could be located without fear of damaging a bearing, if you wanted to install one. Drilling around needle bearings scares me a lot, bushings and sleeves no problem since they are easy to clean out the burrs. The ball and socket joints need grease zerks, but that would be pretty hard to design?.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,876 Posts
drill in middle of the rocker arm. The grease is for the bearings and all so for the rocker shaft. It will help with the movement of the rocker. I can bet your shaft had markes wear its been rubbing

Did not think you were a dirt rider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Where can I find this technique that you reference from HC?
Don't remember what post, something along the lines of belt adjustment. It's pretty simple once you have the belt adjusted properly, which for me takse about 3 tried to get it right. After that, your next tire change do not change the belt adjusters. Install the rear wheel pushing the tire tight up against your preset adjusters and tighten up the axle. I used a ratchet strap to snug the rear wheel up against the adjusters, worked great for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
drill in middle of the rocker arm. The grease is for the bearings and all so for the rocker shaft. It will help with the movement of the rocker. I can bet your shaft had markes wear its been rubbing

Did not think you were a dirt rider.
There was a little color difference but no wear marks. pretty darn smooth. I felt pretty lucky.
I 'm afraid my dirt bike days are over. Healing takes way to long.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
405 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I spent more time thinking about removing the swing arm than actually removing it. Pretty darn easy. As you most likely already know, needle bearings on the left and sealed ball bearings on the right. Book illustrates removing the swing arm axle to the left. Torque on the right nut is 65 ft-lbs.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top